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1967 Ferrari 330 P4 (1/24) (fs) 1989 Mercedes Benz 300CE SL W124 Grille Coupe (1/24) (fs)
Our Price: $58.90
Our Price: $59.90
1967 Ferrari 330 P4 (1/24) (fs)

1967 was a banner year for the Enzo Ferrari motor company, as it saw the production of the mid-engined 330 P4, a renowned V12 endurance car meant to replace the previous year's P3. Only four Ferrari P4-engined cars were ever made: three new 330 P4s and one ex P3 chassis (0846). Their three-valve cylinder head was modeled after those of Italian Grand Prix-winning Formula One cars. To this was added the same fuel injection system from the P3 for an output of up to 450 hp (335 kW).
1989 Mercedes Benz 300CE SL W124 Grille Coupe (1/24) (fs)
2005 Ferrari Super America (1/24 (fs) 2012 Ferrari F12 Berlinetta (1/24 (fs)
Our Price: $38.90
Our Price: $79.90
Introduced in 2005, the Ferrari 575M Superamerica was a convertible version of the 575M Maranello; it featured an electrochromic glass panel roof which rotated 180° (both are production car firsts) at the rear to lie flat over the boot. With the roof open the rear window, apart for holding the third stop light, also acts as a wind deflector.The Superamerica used the higher-output tune of the V-12 engine, F133 G, rated at 533 hp (397 kW; 540 PS) and Ferrari marketed it as the world's fastest convertible, with a top speed of 199 mph (320 km/h). A total of 559 Superamericas were built; this number followed Enzo Ferrari's philosophy that there should always be one fewer car available than what the market demanded.

This finely engraved Fujimi kit is more of a curbside kit and does not include a detailed engine bay with opening hood. It does include 72 parts including plated parts and clear parts as well as high quality Cartograph decals with authentic Ferrari badging. The body is molded in white, interior in tan, and chassis parts in black.

The F12 Berlinetta debuted at the 2012 Geneva Motor Show and replaced the Ferrari 599 Series of Grand Tourers. The naturally aspirated 6.3 litre Ferrari V12 engine in the F12 Berlinetta has won the International Engine of the Year Awards 2013 in the Best Performance category and Best Engine above 4.0 litres. The F12 Berlinetta was also named "The Supercar of the Year 2012" by car magazine Top Gear.

With a detailed engine, two trees of photo-etch parts, and poseable doors, this finely engraved detailed Fujimi kit is sure to delight the exotic car modeler and Ferrari lover alike.
Dino Ferrari 246GT Sports Car (1/24) (fs) Driver Figures & Mechanics Figures with Interior Accessories (1/24) (fs)
Our Price: $36.90
Our Price: $24.90
Dino Ferrari 246GT Sports Car (1/24) (fs)

Dino was a marque for mid-engined, rear-drive sports cars produced by Ferrari from 1968 to 1976. Used for models with engines with fewer than 12 cylinders, it was an attempt by the company to offer a relatively low-cost sports car. The Ferrari name remained reserved for its premium V-12 and flat 12 models until 1976, when "Dino" was retired in favor of full Ferrari branding.

Named to honor Ferrari founder Enzo Ferrari's son and heir Dino Ferrari, the Dino models used Ferrari racing naming designation of displacement and cylinder count with two digits for the size of the engine in deciliters and the third digit to represent the number of cylinders, i.e. 246 being a 2.4-litre 6-cylinder and 308 being a 3.0-litre 8-cylinder. Ferrari street models of the time used a three-digit representation of the displacement in cubic centimeters of one of the 12 cylinders, which would have been meaningless in a brand with differing numbers of cylinders.

In 1969 the 206 GT was superseded by the more powerful Dino 246 GT. The 246 GT was powered by an enlarged 2.4 L V6 engine, producing with 195 PS (143 kW; 192 hp) at 7,600 rpm in European specification. Initially available as a fixed-top GT coupe, a targa topped GTS was also offered after 1971.
Driver Figures & Mechanics Figures with Interior Accessories (1/24) (fs)
Ferrari F430 Challenge Sports Car (1/24) (fs) Ford GT40 Mk II #1 1966 LeMans Race Car (1/24) (fs)
Our Price: $38.90
Our Price: $48.90
Ferrari F430 Challenge Sports Car (1/24) (fs)

The Ferrari F430 Challenge is a production-based race car built by Ferrari. The car is directly based on the standard F430 and uses the same 4.3L V8 engine. It was introduced at the 2005 Frankfurt Motor Show to supersede the Ferrari 360 Challenge in the Ferrari Challenge and the Rolex Sports Car racing series. it has been extensively modified by Ferrari to boost its on circuit performance with extensive weight reduction and suspension changes. Just like in previous Ferrari Challenge cars the engine has largely remained the same as on the production road cars except for some enhanced breathing by means of a racing exhaust system and some engine management tweaks and fine blueprinting. Furthermore the body styling has received very few styling changes with the Formula One inspired single central nut (slick shod) BBS wheels hiding enormous carbon brakes.
Ford GT40 Mk II #1 1966 LeMans Race Car (1/24) (fs)

The Mk.II was very similar in appearance to the Mk.I, but it actually was a bit different from its predecessor. It used the 7.0-litre FE (427 ci) engine from the Ford Galaxie, which was an engine used in NASCAR at the time—but the engine was modified for road course use. The car's chassis was more or less the same as the British-built Mk.I chassis, but it and other parts of the car had to be re-designed and modified by Carroll Shelby's organization in order to accommodate the larger and heavier 427 engine. A new Kar Kraft-built 4 speed gearbox (same as the one described above; Ford-designed, using Galaxie gearsets) was built to handle the more powerful engine, replacing the ZF 5-speed used in the Mk.I. This car is sometimes referred to as the Ford Mk.II.

In 1966, the Mk.II dominated Le Mans, taking European audiences by surprise and beating Ferrari to finish 1-2-3 in the standings. After the success of these Mk.II cars, the Ford GT40 went on to win the race for the next three years, being undefeated until 1970.
Garage Tools (Antique Garage) (1/24) (fs) Garage Tools (Asst hand tools, tool chests, jacks, eng stand, etc) (1/24) (fs)
Our Price: $39.90
Our Price: $27.90
Garage Tools (Antique Garage with 'faux wooden floors and walls) great pair with the Fujimi Garage Tools (1/24) (fs) Garage Tools (Asst hand tools, tool chests, jacks, eng stand, etc) (1/24) (fs)
Garage Tools (The Garage itself) (1/24) (fs) Garage Tools 2 (Compressor, Shop Vac, Lockers, etc) (1/24) (fs)
Our Price: $39.90
Our Price: $48.90
Garage Tools (The Garage itself) great pair with the tools (1/24) (fs) Garage Tools 2 (Compressor, Shop Vac, Lockers, etc) (1/24) (fs)

All the goodies you would expect to find in a well-equipped modern garage. Though referenced in the instruction sheet in the boiler plate that comes with all Fujimi models, this kit does not include decals.
Garage Tools 3 (Creeper, Roll Cart, Battery Charger, Diagnostic Station, Bicycle, etc) (1/24) (fs) Lotus Europa Special (1/24) (fs)
Our Price: $48.90
Our Price: $49.90
Garage Tools 3 (Creeper, Roll Cart, Battery Charger, Diagnostic Station, Bicycle, etc) (1/24) (fs) All the goodies you would expect to find in a well-equipped modern garage. Though referenced in the instruction sheet in the boiler plate that comes with all Fujimi models, this kit does not include decals.
The Lotus Europa name is used on two distinct mid-engined GT coupé cars built by Lotus Cars. The original Europa and its variants comprise the Lotus Types 46, 47, 54, 65 and 74, and were produced between 1966 and 1975. The second vehicle is the Type 121 Europa S, a Lotus Elise-derived design produced from 2006 to 2010. This model kit authentically replicates the first generation Europa.

The Europa concept is believed to have originated during 1963 with drawings done by Ron Hickman, then director of Lotus Engineering, for Lotus'a bid for the Ford GT40 racing car project. When that contract was lost to Lola Cars, Chapman chose to use Hickman's highly efficient aerodynamic design as the basis for a new mid-engined production model originally intended to succeed the Lotus 7.

By the mid-1960s, the mid-engine vehicle configuration was well-established as the optimal design for Grand Prix cars, however almost no road vehicles yet used this arrangement. Lotus planned the Europa to be a volume-produced, two-seater mid-engined sports coupe built to reasonable cost, quite an ambitious goal for the time. Like all Lotus vehicles of the era, the Europa was designed and built following Chapman's oft-stated philosophy of automotive design: "Simplify, then add lightness". To this end, a number of ingenius design approaches were made by Lotus to allow it to economically overcome the many challenges presented by the novel mid-engined arrangement.

Production of the original Lotus Europa ceased in 1975, with a total of 9,230 cars of all models having been built
   
 
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